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LEADERSHIP

General: What is it | You and Scouting | You and Other Leaders | Cubmaster and Committee Chair | Cubmaster and Den Leader Coaches | Cubmaster and Tiger Group Coach | Den Leader Coach and Den Leaders | Cubmaster and Den Leaders | Cubmaster and Webelos Den Leaders | Tips on Problem Solving | You and the Boys | Opening Doors | Setting a Good Example | How Leaders can Help Den Chiefs | Citizenship Requirements | Religious Principles

Job Descriptions: Charter Org. Representative | Pack Committee Chair | Pack Committee | Secretary | Treasurer | Advancement | Training | Public Relations | Outings | Membership and Registration | Friends of Scouting | Cubmaster | Asst. Cubmaster | Den Leader Coach | Tiger Cub Group Coach | Cub Scout Den Leader & Asst. Den Leader | Webelos Den Leader & Assistant Den Leader | Activity Badge Counselor | Troop Webelos Resource Person

Youth Leadership Opportunities: Cub Scout Den Cheif  & Webelos Den Chief | Den Aide | Cub Scout Denner & Asst. Denner | Webelos Denner & Asst. Denner

Excerpted from The Cub Scout Leader Book, 1982 edition, 1995 printing

What Is Leadership? (Top)

In Cub Scouting, leadership is working with boys and their families, improving the life of your community by enriching the lives of the families who live in it. You will be helping boys respect their homes and families, and you will be helping families understand their boys by doing things with them.

In this day and time when the family is becoming less and less important to many people, you, as a Cub Scout leader, will be taking a positive stand in support of the family. As inflation, unemployment, crime, poor housing, and other factors cause stress in families, you will be taking an active part in helping to strengthen those families and the boys in them by providing a fun-filled, worthwhile program that has stood the test of time. Few organizations in history have had the universal impact on the family that can be claimed by Scouting. And you are an important part of that impact today.

Successful leaders are people of character and honesty; people with the ability to guide and influence boys; people with pep, patience, tact, and a sense of humor; people who like boys and have a sense of purpose and direction. Now, before you become alarmed and begin thinking: "I don't have all those qualities," just relax and read on. As all boys are different, so all leaders are different. But there are certain things that Cub Scout leaders need to know and be able to do.

That's the reason for training - to teach leaders the skills and information they need to work successfully with Cub Scouts.

If you have a son, or joined Cub Scouting because you like to work with boys, then you already have a head start. If not, then we can help you learn.

You and Scouting (Top)

Scouting is an association of boys, young men and women, and of volunteer leaders like yourself. The purpose of Scouting is to help boys grow, to be responsible, resourceful members of their communities, their country, and the world, by involvement in many experiences. As a leader, you help them to achieve this goal.

There may be any number of reasons why you decided to join Scouting. Your son may be involved, and you offered to help with a special project and became interested. Perhaps, because of some hobby or talent, you were asked to work with the den for a short period of time, found that you like it, and wanted to continue. You may have volunteered because you like boys, because you have some spare time, or because you want to be involved in more worthwhile activities. Whatever the reason that caused you to think seriously about becoming a registered adult leader, we welcome you to Cub Scouting and urge you to make use of all the resources available. This book is one of the resources that you will use often, and it will lead you to others.

Before you go on, think about yourself and your mason for joining. Understanding your own motives and desires is the first step to understanding your role as a Cub Scout leader

You were selected as an adult leader in the Boy Scouts of America because of your qualifications and your interest in the Scouting program. You have certain responsibilities to the organization. You must be able to accept and live by the aims and ideals of Scouting and do your best to model them for the boys by your own personal example. You must be willing to see that a well-rounded, quality program is presented to the boys that meets their needs and desires and is compatible with the purposes of Cub Scouting. Make an effort to learn all you can about Cub Scouting and your responsibilities as a leader. Wear the official uniform to show that you support the aims of Scouting and are a member of a worldwide movement.

Like everything else of a volunteer nature, you can devote as little or as much time as you wish, but being a Cub Scout leader is not just an hour a week at a den meeting or an hour a month at a pack meeting. The den and pack programs must be planned and detailed preparations made so that they will run smoothly.·l\ good rule of thumb is an hour's preparation time for an hour's program. Crafts and special activities may take more time to prepare. Add to this the time needed for planning meetings, attendance at training courses and monthly roundtables. In the long run, the amount of time you invest in Cub Scouting will depend on your enthusiasm, dedication, and personal involvement. Usually the more time spent, the better program the boys receive.

Your attitude will affect your success as a Cub Scout leader. A confident and enthusiastic attitude is of great benefit. Other people are infected by your enthusiasm. You can inspire others to believe in you, to work with you, and to follow you. If you walk with a spring in your step, work with a sparkle in your eye, and speak with a note of confidence in your voice, you will be showing Cub Scout leadership at its very best.

Throw yourself wholeheartedly into your Cub Scout responsibilities. Go out and ring the bell; don't give up and wring your hands. Be optimistic. Think about how high your kite will fly, not about how soon it will fall. Plan your work, then work your plan. Your actions will tell other people how you feel about Cub Scouting.

As a leader you have made a personal commitment to Scouting. It is a commitment of time, effort, and knowledge. It is a commitment of patience and understanding; a commitment to a way of life, to being a living example for boys, and to lending a helping hand to fellow Scouters. What a fine opportunity for you, as a Cub Scout leader!

You and Other Adult Leaders (Top)

As a Cub Scout leader you are part of a pack leadership team that includes the Cubmaster, assistant Cubmasters, pack committee chairman and members, group and den leader coaches, Cub Scout den leaders and assistants, Webelos den leaders and assistants, and den chiefs. You may also be part of a den leadership team. The importance of the team approach to leadership in the den and pack cannot be overemphasized. No one person can do the job successfully alone.

Cubmaster and Pack Committee Chairman (Top)

The Cubmaster and pack committee chairman work as a team to recruit, train, and motivate committee members, pack leaders, and parents in Cub Scouting. A close working relationship between the pack committee chairman and Cubmaster is vital to the success of the pack.

Cubmaster and Den Leader Coaches (Top)

The den leader coach and Webelos den leader coach, in larger packs, are responsible for keeping the Cubmaster informed about the condition and needs of the dens. Both the Cubmaster and den leader coach are concerned with building strong dens and keeping them at full strength. Together they ensure stable, active, enthusiastic den leaders for each den. The Cubmaster's best opportunity to keep in touch with dens is through the den leader coaches at the monthly pack leaders' meetings. The Cubmaster will want to know about the performance of den chiefs, about den leaders who are doing an especially good job and should be recognized, about Cub Scouts who are about to become eligible for induction into Webelos dens, and about any dens with leadership or program problems.

The den leader coach and Webelos den leader coach are the Cubmaster's chief helpers in finding qualified new Cub Scout and Webelos den leaders.

In small packs, the Cubmaster may be able to work directly with den leaders, providing Fast Start training and help in planning den programs without the assistance of a den leader coach. However, if your pack has three or more Cub Scout dens and has no den leader coach or more than two Webelos dens and no Webelos den leader coach, there can be problems. It is possible the Cubmaster will be overloaded, trying to help all of the dens and carrying out other responsibilities as well. And there is the possibility the den leaders may be shortchanged in help. Experience proves these problems can be prevented when the pack committee recruits a qualified person to serve as den leader coach.

Cubmaster and Tiger Cub Group Coach (Top)

The Tiger Cub group coach is responsible for organizing and giving continuing support to the Tiger Cub groups, and to ensure their participation in pack activities and their graduation into the pack at the end of their Tiger Cub year. The Cubmaster can assist in the training of the Tiger Cub group coach using the Fast Start training video, The New Tiger Cub Group Coach. As with the den leader coaches, the Cubmaster will find that the best opportunity to keep in touch with the Tiger Cub groups is through the Tiger Cub group coach at the monthly pack leaders' meeting.

Den Leader Coach and Den Leaders (Top)

The den leader coach provides immediate help and Fast Start training for new den leaders and provides continuing support and assistance for all den leaders. Den leaders should realize the den leader coach is always ready to help, and they are free to seek advice whenever it is needed.

A frank, friendly relationship between the den leader coach and den leaders is important so situations can be discussed openly and solutions reached. The den leader coach is usually an experienced den leader and the den leader's chief helper in planning den programs and providing practical ideas to make den meetings successful.

Den leaders should be able to count on the den leader coach to hold regular monthly planning meetings to work out the details of next month's den meetings. This is also a time den leaders can get help on behavior problems, record keeping, use of literature, and ideas for involving parents.

Cubmaster and Cub Scout Den Leaders (Top)

The Cubmaster will want to be sure den leaders know help is available and that they can feel free to ask for advice of either the den leader coach or the Cubmaster. The Cubmaster will want to be sure den leaders have sufficient help in planning den meeting programs.

A good relationship between the Cubmaster and den leaders also includes never going over their heads in matters concerning their dens. Never change a Cub Scout from one den to another or make a change in den chiefs without first discussing it with the den leader involved.

A good Cubmaster remembers that without den leaders, there would be no Cub Scouting. The most qualified persons available should be recruited for the job and recognition should be given when it is due.

Cubmaster and Webelos Den Leaders (Top)

The Cubmaster's best opportunity to keep in touch with Webelos den leaders is at the monthly pack leaders' meetings. A close working relationship between the two is important so the final goal of Cub Scouting - graduating boys into Boy Scouting--can be met.

Although the Webelos den leaders are responsible both for the long-range and detailed monthly plans of Webelos den meetings, the Cubmaster will need to be kept informed. The Cubmaster will want to know about the performance of den chiefs, about Webelos Scouts who have earned awards, and those who are eligible for graduation, as well as about any needs or problems of the Webelos den. (See specific leadership headings later in this chapter for further information.)

Tips on Solving Problems (Top)

Whenever you are working with other people, there is a chance problems will occur. Often problems happen when leaders forget the long-range objectives of the Cub Scout program. Always remember: The boy is the most important part of the program. That's why we have Cub Scouting, that's why we have leaders, and that's the reason we are here. When you keep that in mind, problems will be less likely to happen, but, if problems do occur, do these things:

1. Identify the problem. Make sure you have the facts straight and that you have all the facts.

2. Face the problem and deal with it. It won't go away by being ignored.

3. Recognize the real source of the problem.

4. Care about the people involved and seek their best interests. Remember the boys.

5. Be willing to listen to all sides and viewpoints.

6. Be tolerant and forgiving. Seek to strengthen rather than to weaken relationships.

7. Decide what can be done to solve the problem and act on your decision.

8. Be thankful for problems. We learn from them.

You and the Boys (Top)

Your responsibilities to boys are to:

· Respect their rights as individuals and to treat them as such.

· See that they find the stimulation, fun, and adventure they expected when they joined.

· Develop among them a feeling of togetherness and of team spirit that gives them security and pride.

· "DO Your Best" as a leader.

You will find the boys full of anticipation and enthusiasm. Their viewpoint is fresh and sparkling. Any adult who works with such raw materials cannot help but catch some of those qualities.

In working with the boys, keep your sense of humor. Don't wear your feelings too close to the surface. Many things that at first glance seem very serious are actually funny. Keep your leadership on a light and free level, and chances are, boys will respond in the same way. Then everybody gets more out of Cub Scouting.

Of course there will be challenges along the way. But you will find more than enough satisfaction to balance them. And as you help to strengthen the families and build your community, your faith in other people will increase as you see them working together on behalf of boys. That's a good feeling to have.

Opening Doors for Boys (Top)

Cub Scout leaders have the marvelous opportunity to open doors for boys, to lead them into areas of exciting newness. This art of adding dimension to a boy's world doesn't require a great deal of time. It simply means doing things with boys rather than doing things for them or to them. One den leader we know keeps a "Why Not?" notebook. In it are all sorts of offbeat and exciting ideas. "Why not take the boys to the police station--get them fingerprinted?" "Why not make a raft and float down the creek?" "Why not visit a dairy farm -- let them milk a cow." When asked where he got his ideas, he explained --when he was a child, he had an uncle who used to open doors for him, just as he is now opening doors for Cub Scouts.

One Cubmaster watched a boy dissolve into tears as he tried hard to beat his own record for push-ups in the pack's physical fitness competition. He protested tearfully that it was just too difficult. The Cubmaster said calmly: "If it were easy, it wouldn’t be any fun." That casual phrase stuck in the boy's mind and eventually he did top his own record. Boys are naturally inquisitive and like to try out new things. But they can't always find those things by themselves. Someone must offer them the choices. A leader who shares enthusiasm, who watches for areas of interest, who gives encouragement and praise for achievement, who makes a game of finding out the answers to questions, and who goes out of his way to furnish the tools of learning is opening doors that will bring out the best in boys. The opportunities are there, waiting for us. All we have to do is recognize them and use them.

Setting a Good Example (Top)

A small boy was asked: "What do you want to be when you grow up?" Without a moment's hesitation he replied: "Just like my dad!" How fortunate for that dad. The little boy was so proud of him that he wanted to follow his example. That's what real leadership is all about. And that's why Scouting is important in setting a good example.

Not all boys have dads, and some of those who do would not want to follow their examples. The way Cub Scout leaders live speaks so loudly we can't hear what they're saying. Cub Scouts will do as we do far more quickly than they will do as we say.

Boys watch what you do. So watch what you do!

Here are some ways to set a good example for the boys: Be fair and honest. You will earn the respect of the boys in this way. No amount of ability, knowledge, or wisdom will make up for not being respected. Don't hesitate to admit you don't know something. Offer to help find the answer, then do it. The boys will respect your honesty and learn from it. Be on your good behavior at all times and remember you're an adult. Act like an adult. Follow the Golden Rule. Be courteous. Good manners are never out of date. It's a way of showing you care.


LEADERSHIP QUALIFICATIONS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

Charter Organization Representative (Top)

Qualifications: An adult citizen of the United States 21 years of age or older and member of the chartered organization, other than the unit leader or assistant unit leader, appointed by the chartered organization to be its official Scouting representative and registered as an adult leader of BSA.

Responsibilities: The chartered organization representative has the responsibility to:

· Help recruit the right leadership for the unit.

· Encourage unit leaders and committee members to take training.

· Promote well-planned unit programs.

· Serve as a liaison between the units and the organization.

· Organize enough units.

· Promote the recruiting of new members.

· See that boys graduate from unit to unit.

· Assist with the rechartering.

· Suggest Good Turns for the organization.

· Encourage unit committee meetings.

· Emphasize advancement and recognition.

· Bring district help and promote its use.

· Use approved unit finance policies.

· Encourage recognition of leaders.

· Cultivate resources to support the organization.

· Represent the organization on the council.

The chartered organization representative is the direct contact between the pack and the chartered organization. This individual is also the contact with the district committee and the local council. The chartered organization representative may become a member of the district committee and is a voting member of the council. If the chartered organization has more than one unit, the representative serves all.

Pack Committee Chairman (Top)

Qualifications: An adult citizen of the U.S., at least 21 years of age, appointed by the chartered organization, and registered as an adult leader of the BSA. A person of good character, familiar with organization procedure, with a deep concern for the pack's success. Preferably a member of the chartered organization, respected in the community, and shows the willingness and ability to be the Cubmaster's chief adviser.

Responsibilities: The pack committee chairman's job is to:

· Maintain a close relationship with the chartered organization representative, keeping this key person informed of the needs of the pack which must be brought to the attention of the organization or the district.

· Report to the chartered organization to cultivate harmonious relations.

· Confer with the Cubmaster on policy matters relating to the Cub Scout program and the chartered organization.

· Supervise pack committee operation by:

    a. Calling and presiding at pack leaders' meetings.

    b. Assigning duties to and training committee members.

    c. Planning for pack charter review, roundup, and reregistration.

    d. Approving bills before payment by pack treasurer.

· Conduct the annual pack program planning conference and pack leader meetings.

· Complete Pack Committee Fast Start Training and Cub Scout Leader Basic Training.

· Ask committee to assist with recommendations for Cubmaster, assistant Cubmasters, den leader coaches, Webelos den leaders, and den leaders, as needed.

· See that new dens are formed when needed and be alert to recognize the need for more Webelos dens.

· Work with the chartered organization representative to provide adequate and safe facilities for pack meetings.

· Cooperate with the Cubmaster on council-approved money-earning projects so the pack may have money for material and equipment.

· Control finances through adequate financial records.

· Maintain adequate pack records and take care of pack property.

· Assume active direction of the pack, if the Cubmaster is unable to serve, until a successor is recruited and commissioned.

· Provide a parent training program.

· Develop and maintain strong pack/troop relationships, sharing with the troop committee the need for graduations into the troop.

· Work closely with the unit commissioner and other pack and troop leaders in effecting a smooth transition of Webelos Scouts into the troop.

· Help bring families together at joint Webelos den (or pack)/ troop activities.

· Support the policies of the Boy Scouts of America.

The Pack Committee Functions

Every pack is under the supervision of a pack committee, consisting of a minimum of three qualified U.S. citizens of good character, 21 years of age or older, selected by the chartered organization and registered as adult leaders of the BSA. One of these is designated as pack committee chairman.

Obviously, with a committee of three, members must assume responsibility for more areas of service than with a committee of seven or more, where the responsibilities can be spread around. Although packs can and do operate with a minimum of three committee members, experience proves that a larger committee generally ensures a stronger, more stable pack.

Responsibilities: Regardless of the size of the pack committee, these responsibilities must be carried out:

· Recommend leaders' membership in the pack to the chartered organization for final approval.

· Recruit the Cubmaster and one or more assistant Cubmasters, with the approval of the chartered organization.

· Provide adequate and safe facilities for pack meetings.

· Coordinate the pack program with the program of the chartered organization through the chartered organization representative.

· Assist with pack charter renewal.

· Help to stimulate the interest of parents through proper programming.

· Supervise finances and equipment.

· Work closely with Cubmaster.

· Assure Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts of a year-round quality program.

· Complete Pack Committee Fast Start Training and Cub Scout Leader Basic Training.

· Conduct, with the help of the Cubmaster, periodic training for parents.

· Cooperate with other Scouting units.

A strong pack committee will have individual members assigned to such areas as recruiting and correspondence, finance, advancement, training, public relations, membership, and reregistration. The pack committee chairman decides how the responsibilities should be divided and makes assignments to committee members. Details of the various pack committee functions follows.

Secretary (Top)

· Keep informed of all Cub Scout program literature, materials, records, and forms so as to help leaders function effectively. Help new den leaders by telling them what items are available.

· Acquaint den leaders with contents of the Pack Record Book so they will know how to supply the information that needs to be recorded there.

· Maintain up-to-date information on membership, leadership, attendance, and advancement in the Pack Record Book.

· Maintain an inventory of pack property.

· Handle correspondence for the pack. This may be writing letters of appreciation, writing for reservations, or sending orders for supplies to the council service center.

· Keep notes on pack leaders and committee meetings. Only key items need to be recorded such as things needing follow-up or items for the history of the pack.

· Notify leaders of pack leaders' meetings and other activities.

· Provide den leaders with records and forms for meetings.

Treasurer (Top)

· Help the pack committee and Cubmaster in establishing a sound financial program for the pack with a pack budget plan.

· Open or maintain a bank account in the name of the pack and arrange for all transactions to be signed by any two: Cubmaster, chairman, secretary, or treasurer.

· Approve all budget expenditures. Check all disbursements against budget allowances, and pay bills by check. Pack committee chairman should approve bills before payment.

· Collect dues from Cub Scout and Webelos den leaders at the pack leaders' meeting, preferably in sealed den dues envelopes. Open envelopes in presence of den leaders or den leader coach. Give receipts for these funds and deposit money in bank account.

· Keep up-to-date financial records. Enter all income and expenditures under the proper budget item in the Finance Section of the Pack Record Book. Credit each Cub Scout with payment of dues. From time to time, compare the records with those of the den leaders to make sure they are in agreement. Give leadership in developing a coordinated recrudescing system in the pack.

· Be responsible for thrift training within the pack. Encourage each den leader to explain the pack financial plan to each boy and his family, so that boys will accept responsibility for paying dues and parents will be alert for opportunities for boys to earn dues money and develop habits of thrift.

· On request of den leaders, sympathetically counsel with a boy who does not pay dues, determine the reason, and stimulate regular payment. If the boy is unable to pay, work out a plan with the Cubmaster and pack committee so the boy can earn dues.

· Make periodic reports on the pack's financial condition at monthly pack meeting. Make regular monthly reports to pack committee at pack leaders' meeting, and report to chartered organization as often as desirable on the financial condition of the pack.

· Provide petty cash needed by leaders. Keep a record of expenditures.

· Guide pack in conducting council-approved pack money-earning project.

Advancement (Top)

· Have a working knowledge of the Cub Scout and Webelos Scout advancement plans.

· Help plan and conduct induction and advancement recognition ceremonies.

· Arrange for Tiger Cub graduation ceremonies with the Cubmaster and Tiger Cub group coach.

· Train parents and pack committee in ways of stimulating Cub Scout and Webelos Scout advancement.

· Arrange for Webelos graduation ceremonies with Cubmaster, Webelos den leader, and Scoutmaster.

· Promote the use of Cub Scout and Webelos Den advancement charts to record advancement in the den and as an incentive for advancement.

· Promote the use of den doodles as a stimulus for advancement.

· Collect Den Advancement Reports at pack leaders' meetings. Order badges and insignia from the local council service center, using Advancement Report.

· Promote Boys' Life magazine as an aid to advancement.

· Help build or get advancement equipment for use in making advancement ceremonies more effective.

· Promote wearing and proper use of uniform and insignia.

Training (Top)

· Have a working knowledge of the training plan for Cub Scout leaders.

· Promote leaders' attendance at Cub Scout leader training courses, monthly roundtables, Cub Scout leader pow wows, and workshops.

· With the den leader coaches, coordinate Fast Start training for new adult leaders.

· Work with Cubmaster and pack committee to set up a program for training parents.

· Develop a pack library for use by den and pack leaders.

· Encourage full use of program material in Cub Scout and Webelos Scout Program Helps, Boys' Life and Scouting magazines, Cub Scout Leader Program Notebook, and other Cub Scout literature.

· Promote den chiefs' attendance at den chief training conferences.

Public Relations (Top)

· Stimulate pack service projects in the chartered organization, school, and community.

· Promote family participation in all pack events such as blue and gold banquets, pack picnics, and other special events.

· Urge pack participation in appropriate programs of the chartered organization such as the worship service on Scout Sunday or Scout Sabbath if the organization is a church or synagogue, and Cub Scouts are members. Suggest ways of showing interest in the chartered organization's overall program.

· Publicize and promote pack participation in Anniversary Week activities.

· Circulate Tiger Cub, Cub Scout, and Webelos Scout recruiting fliers and leaflets to invite boys to join. Work with pack committee to promote new membership. Let the people in your neighborhood know a Cub Scout pack and Tiger Cub group are available.

· Consider using a monthly or quarterly pack newsletter to inform parents of pack plans, to guide new parents in pack policies, and create a feeling of oneness among members of the pack family.

· Provide pack announcements for regular release in the official bulletins of your chartered organization.

· Make use of the news media in publicizing pack events.

Outings (Top)

· Help the Cubmaster plan and arrange for outdoor activities.

· Arrange for property, fire, and tour permits when required.

· Locate new picnic areas.

· Arrange for safe transportation when needed.

· Plan first aid for emergencies.

· Help the Webelos den leaders plan Webelos overnights.

Help arrange for equipment, as needed.

· Arrange for Safe Swim Defense for all outings involving swimming.

· Plan outings to help pack and dens qualify for National Summertime Pack Award.

· Help inform parents about opportunities for family camping.

· Assist in the promotion of day camp and resident camp opportunities.

· Be aware of BSA health and safety requirements and see that they are carried out.

· Know and carry out BSA outdoor program policy related to Cub Scouting.

Membership and Reregistration (Top)

· Prepare reregistration papers and annual report to chartered organization. Secure signatures and registration fees for coming year.

· Ask chartered organization representative to submit charter application and annual report to chartered organization for approval.

· Arrange with unit commissioner for periodic uniform inspections, annual membership inventory and uniform inspection, and annual charter review meeting which is held at least a month before charter expiration.

· Assist Cubmaster and chartered organization representative in planning and conducting the formal charter presentation.

· Conduct an annual census of boys in the chartered organization for systematic recruiting. Work with pack committee to promote recruiting plans.

· Visit new families in their homes. Review with them the Bobcat requirements and parent guide in the boy's Cub Scout book. Emphasize the part parents play in their son's advancement. Stress parent participation at all pack functions and see that new families are introduced and feel welcome at pack meetings.

· Work with the Cubmaster and pack committee to develop and carry out a plan for year-round membership growth.

· Work with Cubmaster and pack committee to see that eligible boys and parents are moved into a Webelos den at the appropriate time.

· Work with Cubmaster and Webelos den leader to see that Webelos Scouts and parents have a smooth transition into a Boy Scout troop.

· Work with Cubmaster in following up on former pack members who are now Boy Scouts and potential den chiefs. Follow up on Cub Scout dropouts to return them to full, active membership.

Friends of Scouting Enrollment (FOS) (Top)

Some councils rely heavily on units to raise FOS funds (also sometimes called Sustaining Membership Enrollment or SME). The following functions need to be carried out:

· Build organization to enroll parents and Cub Scout leaders in FOS.

· Enroll as a sustaining member.

· Recruit one person as enroller for every five families in the pack.

· Attend FOS kickoff meeting.

· Enroll each enroller as a sustaining member.

· Train enrollers.

· Conduct report meetings.

· Follow up until all cards are accounted for.

· Give recognition to contributors and enrollers.

· Work closely with pack committee on public relations for SME.

Remember, experience proves that a large pack committee is better able to perform all the required functions to ensure successful pack operations. It is also a way of involving more pack families in meaningful service to the pack.

Cubmaster (Top)

Qualifications: An adult U.S. citizen: 21 years of age or older, of good moral character and interested in working with boys. Need not be an expert in all Cub Scout activities but should be a leader who is able to deal with adults as well as boys. Should be able to delegate responsibilities; set a good example by behavior, attitude and uniform; and believe in the values and principles of Cub Scouting. Preferably a member of the chartered organization. Recruited and appointed by the pack committee with the approval of the chartered organization, and registered as an adult leader of the BSA.

Responsibilities: The Cubmaster has the responsibility to:

· Conduct pack program according to the policies of the Boy Scouts of America.

· Complete Cubmaster Fast Start Training and Cub Scout Leader Basic Training. Attend monthly roundtables.

· Plan and help carry out the Cub Scout program in the pack. This includes leading the monthly pack meeting, with the help of other leaders.

· Know about and use literature of the program including Boys' Life and Scouting magazines and Cub Scout and Webelos Scout Program Helps.

· See that the pack program, leaders, and Cub Scouts reflect positively the interests and objectives of the chartered organization and the Boy Scouts of America.

· Work with the pack committee on (1) program ideas, (2) selecting and recruiting adult leaders, and (3) establishing a budget plan.

· Guide and support den leaders. See that they receive the required training for their position. · Recruit den leader coaches as needed.

· Help organize Webelos dens and encourage graduation into a Boy Scout troop.

· Help establish and maintain good relationships with Boy Scout troops.

· Maintain good relationships with parents. Seek their support and include them in activities. Involve male relatives such as uncles and grandfathers, so Cub Scouts will have additional male role models.

· See that Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts receive a quality, year-round program filled with fun and activities and qualifies the dens and pack for the National Summertime Pack Award.

·Guide Cub Scouts in goodwill and conservation projects.

· Supervise the support of the Tiger Cub groups. · See that the responsibilities specified for the assistant Cubmaster are carried out.

· Assist the pack committee chairman in conducting the annual pack program planning conference and the monthly pack leaders' meetings.

· Work as a team with the pack committee chairman to cultivate, educate, and motivate all pack leaders and parents in Cub Scouting.

· Take part in the charter review meeting and annual charter presentation ceremony.

· Recruit den chiefs for all dens. Recognize the den chiefs at pack meetings.

· Meet with Tiger Cubs and their adult partners prior to graduation into the pack to discuss Cub Scouting. · Conduct an impressive graduation ceremony for Tiger Cubs graduating into the pack.

· Meet with unit commissioner, Webelos den leader, and Scoutmaster to establish plans for the Webelos-to-Scout transition.

· Assist in planning and conducting stimulating graduation ceremonies involving parents, the Scoutmaster, the Webelos den chief, Webelos den leader and troop junior leaders.

· Conduct impressive Webelos den induction and Arrow of Light Award ceremonies.

· Encourage high advancement Standards for Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts.

· Help bring families together at joint Webelos den (or pack)/troop joint activities.

In general, the Cubmaster (who is sometimes referred to as the unit leader) is the guiding hand behind the work of other pack leaders and program adviser to the pack committee--a recruiter, a supervisor, a director, a planner, a motivator of other leaders. The responsibilities can be boiled down to the following:

  1. Work directly with the den leader coach, the Tiger Cub group coach, the Cub Scout den leaders, Webelos den leaders, den chiefs, chairman, and members of the pack committee to make sure all groups and dens are functioning well.
  2. Plan the den and pack programs with the help of other leaders.
  3. Lead the monthly pack meeting, with the help of others. Involve all dens in some way.
  4. Coordinate the total Cub Scout program in the pack.

    Everything the Cubmaster does is aimed at helping the individual boy. Securing strong leaders, planning den and pack activities, advising other leaders and parents -- these are all ways in which the Cubmaster ·affects the kind of Cub Scouting each boy in the pack is offered. Although this job is an executive position, the Cubmaster has direct influence on the lives of individual boys by keeping in mind that boys can be made better through Cub Scouting.

    Assistant Cubmaster (Top)

    Every pack should have at least one assistant Cubmaster. In most packs, two or three will be helpful, allowing the Cubmaster to divide the responsibilities.

    Qualifications: A U.S. citizen, at least 18 years of age, of good moral character and interested in working with boys. At least one assistant Cubmaster should be able to fill the Cubmaster's shoes in case of an emergency. Recommended by the Cubmaster, approved by the pack committee and chartered organization, and registered as an adult leader of the BSA.

    Responsibilities: (as designated by the Cubmaster). The assistant Cubmaster(s) job is to:

    · Assist the Cubmaster as needed. Be ready to take over the leadership of the pack, if necessary.

    · Complete Cubmaster Fast Start Training and Cub Scout Leader Basic Training. Attend monthly roundtables.

    · Participate in pack meetings.

    · Supervise den chiefs and see that they are trained.

    · Work with neighborhood troops that supply den chiefs and into which Cub Scouts will graduate. · Help inform pack leaders of training opportunities and arrange for them to attend training sessions.

    · Work with pack committee to develop and promote an ongoing plan for recruiting new boys.

    · Work with the Cubmaster and pack committee on pack reregistration.

    · Assist in pack activities such as dinners, pinewood derby, bike safety, service projects, etc.

    · Work with the pack committee on outings to see that the pack and dens qualify for the National Summertime Pack Award.

    · Participate in the pack's annual program planning conference and pack leaders' meetings.

    · Promote the religious emblems programs for Cub Scouts of all faiths.

    · Support the policies of the Boy Scouts of America.

    Den Leader Coach (Top)

    Qualifications: A U S. citizen: at least 21 years of age, of good moral character. Should be an experienced person (usually a former den leader) who is a good listener and capable of recruiting, encouraging and training Cub Scout or Webelos den leaders. Preferably a member of chartered organization. Recommended by Cubmaster, approved by pack committee and chartered organization, and registered as an adult leader of the BSA. If a pack has three or more Webelos dens, a Webelos den leader coach should be selected, in addition to a den leader coach for Cub Scout dens.

    Responsibilities: The den leader coach's responsibilities are to:

    · Help ensure stable, active, enthusiastic den leaders for all Cub Scout or Webelos dens.

    · Complete Fast Start training, Cub Scout Leader Basic Training, and the Den Leader Coach Seminar. Attend monthly roundtables.

    · Help Cub Scout or Webelos den leaders understand the purposes, policies, and procedures of the chartered organization and the Boy Scouts of America.

    · Give immediate help and Fast Start training to new den leaders. Help them plan and conduct their first several meetings.

    · Encourage den leaders to attend basic training and to qualify for Cub Scout leader recognition awards. See that they are appropriately recognized.

    · Encourage den leaders to attend monthly roundtables, or represent them there.

    · Hold monthly meetings with den leaders to help plan den activities and programs agreed upon at monthly pack leaders' meetings.

    · Be thoroughly informed and up to date on the latest program literature and material.

    · Give continuing support and help to den leaders. Offer help, encouragement, direction, training, and new ideas, without taking over the den.

    · Be available to attend den meetings as needed.

    · See that dens are never without a leader and assistant.

    Be ready to fill in for a den leader in case of emergency.

    · Help Cubmaster in recruiting new den leaders and assistant den leaders.

    · Be sure den leaders understand the pack budget plan.

    · Be sure den leaders understand the importance of den records and how to keep them.

    · Serve as the communications link between the Cubmaster and Cub Scout or Webelos den leaders. Keep the Cubmaster informed on the successes and needs of dens.

    · Participate in the pack's annual program planning conference and pack leaders' meetings.

    · Participate in pack meetings.

    · Support the policies of the Boy Scouts of America.

    Tiger Cub Group Coach (Top)

    The Tiger Cub group coach is a member of the pack leadership, recommended by the Cubmaster and approved by the pack committee and chartered organization. Responsibilities are:

    · Complete Tiger Cub Group Coach Fast Start Training.

    · Organize and provide orientation for Tiger Cub groups.

    · Maintain contact with each Tiger Cub group through the host team for that month's group gathering(s).

    · Coordinate Tiger Cub participation in pack activities and Tiger Cub graduation ceremony.

    · Reregister the Tiger Cubs and their adult partners as a part of the pack's annual charter renewal process. Follow up to ensure graduation of all Tiger Cubs into Cub Scouting.

    · Serve as a resource person for the Tiger Cub groups.

    · Report on progress of Tiger Cub groups at monthly pack leader meetings.

    Cub Scout Den Leader (Top)

    Qualifications: A US. citizen, at least 21 years of age and of good moral character. Should be interested in and enjoy working with boys and able to work with adults. May be a parent of one of the boys in the den. Recommended by Cubmaster after consultation with parents of the Cub Scouts involved, and approved by the pack committee and chartered organization. Registered as an adult leader of the BSA.

    Responsibilities: The Cub Scout den leader has the responsibility to:

    · Give leadership to carrying out the pack program in the den.

    · Complete Den Leader Fast Start Training and Cub Scout Leader Basic Training. Attend monthly roundtables.

    · Lead the den in its participation at pack meetings. Serve as den host or hostess for den parents at pack meetings. · Work in harmony with other den and pack leaders.

    · Cooperate with the Cubmaster (or assistant Cubmaster) in recruiting new boys.

    · Help train the den chief and guide him to work with the Cub Scouts. See that he receives recognition for his efforts at den and pack meetings.

    · Meet regularly with the den chief. Let him help plan den meetings and den activities, and allow him to serve as den activities assistant.

    · Provide meaningful jobs for the denner and assistant denner so they can learn responsibility and have satisfaction from their efforts.

    · Use Boys' Life and Scouting magazines, Cub Scout Program Helps; the boys' books, and other Cub Scout literature as a source of program ideas.

    · Collect weekly den dues and turn them in to the pack treasurer at monthly pack leaders' meetings (or to den leader coach at monthly den leader/den leader coach meetings). Keep accurate records of den dues and attendance.

    · Maintain a friendly relationship with Cub Scouts, encouraging them to earn the advancement awards. Keep accurate advancement records and see that boys receive recognition for their achievement.

    · Stimulate the Cub Scouts' imaginations on the program theme for the month and help the den prepare its stunts and exhibits for the pack meeting.

    · Help the den and pack earn the National.Summertime Pack Award.

    · Help establish a close working relationship with the assistant den leader and den chief, functioning as a den leadership team.

    · Develop a good working relationship with den parents and families. Use their talents to help enrich the den program. Hold den parents' meetings to get acquainted and as often as needed to strengthen den operation.

    Have open communications with den families.

    · Involve den fathers, uncles, and grandfathers in outings and other den activities so boys will have additional male role models.

    · See that a leader is available for all den meetings and activities. Call on the assistant den leader or den leader coach to fill in when necessary.

    · Take part in the pack's annual program planning conference and pack leaders' meetings (or den leader/den leader coach meetings).

    · Help set a good example for the boys by behavior, attitude, and proper uniforming.

    · Support the policies of the Boy Scouts of America.

    The responsibilities can be boiled down to the following:

    1. Work directly with other den and pack leaders to ensure his/her den is an active and successful part of the pack.
    2. Plan, prepare for, and conduct den meeting with the assistant den leader and den chief.
    3. Attend the pack leaders' meetings.
    4. Lead the den at the monthly pack activity.

      Assistant Cub Scout Den Leader (Top)

      Each den should have at least one assistant den leader, and more, if needed.

      Qualifications: A US. citizen: at least 18 years of age, of good moral character, and able to perform the duties assigned by the den leader. Should be able to fill in for the den leader in case of emergency. Recommended by Cubmaster after consultation with the den leader and parents of the Cub Scouts involved, and approved by the pack committee and chartered organization. Registered as an adult leader of BSA.

      Responsibilities: The assistant Cub Scout den leader has the responsibility to:

      · Assist the den leader as needed. Carry out the duties assigned by the den leader. Be ready to fill in for the den leader in case of emergency.

      · Help establish a close working relationship with the den leader and den chief, functioning as a den leadership team.

      · Complete Den Leader Fast Start Training and Cub Scout Leader Basic Training. Attend monthly roundtables.

      · Attend pack meetings and assist as needed.

      · Take part in the pack's annual program planning conference and pack leaders' meetings (or den leader/den leader coach meetings).

      · Work in harmony with other den and pack leaders.

      · Support the policies of the Boy Scouts of America.

      The assistant den leader shares the work of the Cub Scout den leader and may be called upon to serve as a parent contact, record keeper, or handle other details of den operation.

      Webelos Den Leader (Top)

      Qualifications: A U.S. citizen: at least 21 years of age, and of good moral character. Should be interested in and enjoy working with boys and able to work with adults. May be a parent of one of the boys in the den. Recommended by the Cubmaster after consultation with parents of the Webelos Scouts involved, and approved by the pack committee and chartered organization. Registered as an adult leader of the BSA.

      Responsibilities: The Webelos den leader has the responsibility to:

      · Give leadership to planning and carrying out a year round program of activities for the Webelos den to achieve the purposes of Cub Scouting.

      · Complete Webelos Leader Fast Start Training, basic training, and Webelos Leader Outdoor Training. Attend monthly roundtables.

      · Lead the den in its participation at the monthly pack meetings.

      · Help establish a close working relationship with the assistant Webelos den leader and Webelos den chief, functioning with them as a den leadership team.

      · Work in harmony with other den and pack leaders.

      · Work with the Cubmaster and pack committee in recruiting new Webelos Scouts.

      · Help train the Webelos den chief and guide him to work with Webelos Scouts. Attend the den chief training conference with him. See that he receives recognition for his efforts at den and pack meetings.

      · Meet regularly with the Webelos den chief. Let him help plan Webelos den meetings and activities. Give him meaningful assignments.

      · Provide worthwhile tasks for the Webelos denner so he can assume some responsibility and have satisfaction from his efforts.

      · Use Boys' Life and Scouting magazines and Webelos Scout Helps as resources for ideas and information. · Instill Scouting's spirit and moral values by personal example, ceremonies, and meaningful activities such as service projects.

      · Collect den dues and turn them in to the pack treasurer at the pack leaders' meeting. Keep accurate records of den dues and attendance.

      · Encourage Webelos Scouts to advance. Maintain high advancement standards. Keep accurate advancement records and see that the boys are promptly recognized for their achievement.

      · With the help of the Cubmaster, pack committee, and unit commissioner, determine one or more neighborhood Boy Scout troops into which Webelos Scouts will be graduated and establish a good working relationship with those troops. Try to graduate every Webelos Scout into a troop.

      · Work with the Scoutmaster and assistant Scoutmaster to plan and conduct meaningful joint activities.

      · Work with the Cubmaster to see that impressive graduation ceremonies are conducted in the pack. Invite the Scoutmaster and troop leaders to take part.

      · Ask qualified persons, including adult family members, to serve as activity badge counselors.

      · Encourage parents of Webelos Scouts to help plan and carry out overnight campouts and other outdoor activities. Work with troop assistant or Scoutmaster to arrange for loan of troop equipment and on joint Webelos den/troop activities.

      · Help the den and the pack earn the National Summertime Pack Award.

      · Follow the policies of the Boy Scouts of America. · Have a plan to ensure that a leader is available for all Webelos den meetings and activities. Call on the assistant Webelos den leader to fill in, as needed. · Participate in the Pack’s annual program planning conference and the monthly pack leaders' meetings. · Keep the Cubmaster and pack committee informed on the status and needs of the Webelos den.

      The responsibilities can be boiled down to the following:

      1. Work directly with other den and pack leaders to ensure the den is an active and successful part of the pack.
      2. Plan, prepare for, and conduct den meetings with the assistant and den chief.
      3. Attend pack leaders' meetings.
      4. Lead the den at the pack meetings and activities.

        Assistant Webelos Den Leader (Top)

        Every Webelos den should have one or more assistant den leaders.

        Qualifications: A U.S. citizen, at least 18 years of age, of good moral character and able to perform the duties assigned by the Webelos den leader. Should be able to fill in for the Webelos den leader in case of emergency. Recommended by Cubmaster after consultation with the Webelos den leader and parents of the Webelos Scouts involved, and approved by the pack committee and chartered organization. Registered as an adult leader of the BSA.

        Responsibilities: The assistant Webelos den leader has the responsibility to:

        · Assist the Webelos den leader as needed. Carry out the duties assigned by the Webelos den leader. Be ready to fill in for the den leader in case of emergency.

        · Help establish and maintain a close working relationship with the Webelos den leader and Webelos den chief, functioning with them as a den leadership team.

        · Help establish and maintain good relationships with neighborhood Boy Scout troops into which Webelos Scouts will graduate.

        · Complete Webelos Leader Fast Start Training, Cub Scout Leader Basic Training, and Webelos Leader Outdoor Training. Attend monthly roundtables.

        · Attend monthly pack meetings and assist as needed.

        · Take part in the pack's annual program planning conference, and monthly pack leaders' meetings.

        · Support the policies of the Boy Scouts of America. The assistant Webelos den leader shares the work of the Webelos den leader and may be called upon to handle various details of den operation.

        Qualifications: An older Boy Scout, Varsity Scout, or Explorer (formerly a Boy Scout). Preferably a former Cub Scout, ideally at least First Class rank. Selected by the senior patrol leader and Scoutmaster or Varsity Scout Coach or Explorer Advisor upon request by Cubmaster. Approved by Cubmaster and pack committee for recommendation to den leader. Registered as a member of a troop, team, or post.

        Cub Scout Den Chief (Top)

        Responsibilities: The Cub Scout den chief has the responsibility to:

        · Know the purposes of Cub Scouting.

        · Help Cub Scouts achieve the purposes of Cub Scouting.

        · Serve as the activities assistant at den meetings.

        · Set a good example by attitude and uniforming.

        · Be a friend to the boys in the den.

        · Take part in weekly den meetings.

        · Assist the den in its part of the monthly pack meeting program.

        · Know the importance of the monthly theme and pack meeting plans.

        · Meet regularly with the den leader to review den and pack meeting plans. Meet as needed with adult members of the den, pack, and troop.

        · Receive training from the den leader (and Cubmaster or assistant Cubmaster). Attend den chief training conference.

        · Encourage Cub Scouts to become Webelos Scouts when they are eligible.

        · Help the denner and assistant denner to be leaders.

        Webelos Den Chief (Top)

        Qualifications: An older, experienced Boy Scout, Varsity Scout, or Explorer who has been a Boy Scout. Preferably a boy who is 13 or older and at least First Class rank. Selected by the senior patrol leader and Scoutmaster, Varsity Scout Coach, or Explorer Advisor upon request by Cubmaster or Webelos den leader. Approved by Cubmaster and pack committee for recommendation to Webelos den leader. Registered as a member of a troop, team, or post.

        Responsibilities: The Webelos den chief has the responsibility to:

        · Know the purposes of Cub Scouting.

        · Help Webelos Scouts achieve the purposes of Cub Scouting.

        · Be the activities assistant in Webelos den meetings.

        · Set a good example by attitude and uniforming.

        · Be a friend to the boys in the Webelos den.

        · Take part in weekly den meetings.

        · Assist the Webelos den in its part of the monthly pack meeting.

        · Meet regularly with Webelos den leader to review den meeting plans.

        · Assist Webelos den leaders as requested.

        · Help Webelos Scouts in their work with activity badge counselors.

        · Help the Webelos denner and assistant denner to be leaders.

        · Receive training from the den leader (and Cubmaster or assistant Cubmaster). Attend den chief training conference.

        · Help with Webelos overnight campouts and other outdoor experiences.

        · Help with joint Webelos Scout/Boy Scout activities.

        · Keep in contact with the assistant Scoutmaster in the troop.

        · Assist the assistant Scoutmaster and Cubmaster in planning graduation ceremonies for Webelos Scouts.

        Den Aide (Top)

        Qualifications: A teenage boy or girl, ages 14 through 17, who helps the den leader succeed in bringing the benefits of Cub Scouting to the members of the den. The use of den aides is optional with packs, and is usually done where it is not possible to recruit den chiefs. Den aides are selected by the den leader, with approval of the Cubmaster and pack committee. This is a nonregistered, nonmembership position designed principally to strengthen Cub Scouting in rural and inner-city communities.

        Responsibilities: Similar to those of the den chief, as determined by the den leader.

        Cub Scout Denner (Top)

        The Cub Scout denner is a den member, elected by the den for a short period, usually 1 or 2 months. His responsibilities are determined by the den leader and den chief. This might include helping to set up the den meeting place and cleanup; helping with games, ceremonies, tricks, and puzzles; leading a song; or acting as den cheerleader. He should be given meaningful responsibilities and recognition to help him learn how to be a leader, so all boys will look forward to their turn as denner. (The short term of office is to give all boys the opportunity to serve. The shoulder cord is worn on the left shoulder)

        Cub Scout Assistant Denner (Top)

        A den member, elected by the den for a short term of office to coincide with the denner's term. He assists the denner, and usually becomes denner for the next term.

        Webelos Scout Denner (Top)

        The Webelos Scout denner is a Webelos Scout who has been elected by secret ballot by the Webelos den for a short term of office, usually 3 to 6 months. His responsibilities are determined by the Webelos den leader and Webelos den chief, and might include such things as leading ceremonies, preparing equipment, setting up the meeting room, greeting new boys and helping them get acquainted, assisting with tricks and puzzles, or other worthwhile tasks.

        Webelos Scout Assistant Denner (Top)

        The Webelos Scout assistant denner is a den member, elected by the den for a short term of office to coincide with the denner's term. He assists the denner, and usually becomes denner for the next term.

        Activity Badge Counselor (Top)

        Activity badge counselors know their subjects.  The activity badge counselor may be a Webelos parent, a pack leader, a teacher, coach, or other adult qualified to teach one or more activity badges to Webelos Scouts. This is usually a temporary position.

        Responsibilities: The activity badge counselor's responsibility is to:

        · Provide activity badge instruction at Webelos den meetings, as requested by the Webelos den leader. (This could include providing resources and instruction on model building, leading field trips, instruction and help on collections and specimens, or other projects, depending on the activity badge requirements. The service usually extends over a period of three or four den meetings for each badge.)

        · Be familiar with the Webelos Scout Book in presenting activity badge information and certifying requirements.

        · Help Webelos Scouts gain self-confidence in completing projects and in dealing with adults.

        · Hold to Webelos den time schedule for activity badge instruction.

        · Help recruit other activity badge counselors.

        Troop Webelos Resource Person (Top)

        The Webelos resource person is a clearinghouse of information.

        Qualifications: A registered adult in the troop, usually the assistant Scoutmaster for new Scouts. May have personal knowledge in teaching Boy Scout skills, but equally important, should know where to secure resource people to assist in Webelos activity badges and other projects. Is appointed by the Boy Scout troop to serve as the liaison between the troop and Webelos dents).

        Responsibilities: The troop Webelos resource person's responsibility is to:

        · Work closely with Webelos den leader to use the supportive talents, equipment, and know-how of the troop to help prepare Webelos Scouts and their families for a good Boy Scout experience.

        · Help schedule joint Webelos den (or pack~/troop activities each quarter.

        · Help recruit, train, and inspire a qualified Webelos den chief.

        · Help plan and conduct joint activities.

        · Arrange for loan of troop equipment for Webelos overnight campouts, as needed.

        · Attend occasional Webelos den meetings, particularly those during which there is work or planning related to Boy Scouting.

        · Work with Webelos den leader to make sure graduation ceremonies are exciting.

        · Help recruit activity badge counselors.

        · Help establish and maintain a good working relationship between the troop and pack.

        · Help ensure the smooth transition of Webelos Scouts into the Boy Scout troop.

        How Leaders can help Den Chiefs (Top)

        A den chief needs to know what is expected if he is going to give the kind of leadership that really helps adult leaders. In some packs, an assistant Cubmaster is given the responsibility of working with den chiefs; in other packs, the Cubmaster handles this. But it is really the Cub Scout and Webelos den leaders who have the opportunity to help this junior leader the most with regular on-the-job coaching and encouragement. When a den chief is appointed for the den, the den leader should sit down with him to talk about Cub Scouting, the den, and what is expected of him. This is particularly important if he was never a Cub Scout since he won't have much understanding of how the program works. Every den chief should be given a copy of the Den ChiefHandbook. Some packs include this expense as part of the pack budget. This book explains his duties and tells how he can best work

        Help the den chief learn the tricks of his job.

        ================

        Citizenship Requirements (Top)

        Individuals serving in any official relationship with the Boy Scouts of America shall subscribe to the statement of religious principles, below, and the Scout Oath and Law. They either shall be citizens of the United States or satisfy one of the approved alternates (pursuant to article VIII, section 2, of the Rules and Regulations of the Boy Scouts of America).

        Religious Principles (Top)

        The Boy Scouts of America maintains that no member can grow into the best kind of citizen without recognizing an obligation to God. No matter what the religious faith of the member may be, this fundamental need of good citizenship must be kept before him. The Boy Scouts of America recognizes the religious element in the training of the member, but it is absolutely nonsectarian in its attitude toward that religious training.

        Where a Scouting unit is connected with a distinctly religious organization, no members of other denominations or faith shall be required, because of their membership in the unit, to take part in or observe a religious ceremony distinctly peculiar to that organization.

        The Boy Scouts of America does not define what constitutes belief in God or the practice of religion. The Boy Scouts of America does not require membership in a religious organization or association for enrollment in the movement but does prefer, and strongly encourages, membership and participation in the religious programs and activities of a church, synagogue, or other religious association.

        We respect the convictions of those who exercise their constitutional freedom to practice religion as individuals without formal membership in organized religious organizations.

        Only persons willing to subscribe to these declarations of principles shall be entitled to certificates of leadership in carrying out the Scouting program.

        Throughout life we will be associated with people of different faiths. In the United States we believe in religious freedom. That is why we respect others whose religion may differ from ours, although we may not agree with them. The founders of the United States of America believed in the right of all to worship God in their own way. Their customs may be different from ours, but their hearts are just as true, and their faith just as sincere.


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        General: What is it | You and Scouting | You and Other Leaders | Cubmaster and Committee Chair | Cubmaster and Den Leader Coaches | Cubmaster and Tiger Group Coach | Den Leader Coach and Den Leaders | Cubmaster and Den Leaders | Cubmaster and Webelos Den Leaders | Tips on Problem Solving | You and the Boys | Opening Doors | Setting a Good Example | How Leaders can Help Den Chiefs | Citizenship Requirements | Religious Principles

        Job Descriptions: Charter Org. Representative | Pack Committee Chair | Pack Committee | Secretary | Treasurer | Advancement | Training | Public Relations | Outings | Membership and Registration | Friends of Scouting | Cubmaster | Asst. Cubmaster | Den Leader Coach | Tiger Cub Group Coach | Cub Scout Den Leader & Asst. Den Leader | Webelos Den Leader & Assistant Den Leader | Activity Badge Counselor | Troop Webelos Resource Person

        Youth Leadership Opportunities: Cub Scout Den Cheif  & Webelos Den Chief | Den Aide | Cub Scout Denner & Asst. Denner | Webelos Denner & Asst. Denner



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