Records from the
Revolutionary War Pension Files
of the National Archives
concerning members of the
Yancey family

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AUSTIN YANCEY

REVOLUTIONARY WAR

PENSION FILE IN NATIONAL ARCHIVES

#R11921

State of Illinois, Franklin County, 8 Oct - In the circuit court of said Franklin County On the 8th day of October A.D. 1833, personally appeared Austin Yancey, a resident of Franklin County in the state of Illinois, aged eighty-one years, one month and ten days, who being duly sworn, according to the law, doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain a pension as the benefit of the provision made by the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832. That he entered the service of the state of North Carolina as a volunteer from Rutherford County in said state in the year 1775, that repaired to McKinneys Station on Broad River in said county of Rutherford. At McKinney's Station he attached himself to the command of Colonel William Graham, who at the period mentioned commanded the militia of Rutherford County. Col. William Graham directed him to detach twenty five men and proceed to Chimney Mountain on Broad River and guard the passes in the mountains between that point and Green River Cove (Cave?) a distance of about twenty miles, so as to prevent the Cherokee Indians (then hostile) from making incursions between those two points through the mountain upon the defenseless fronteir settlers on the eastern side. In obedience to the direction given by Col. Graham he repaired to the post assigned, and there continued in [discharge?] of the service required four months and a half. In the mean time Col Graham with the other volunteers marched to [McGravits?] Fort on [Catawba?] River to join the forces under the command of General Charles McDarvel, who at the time commanded the North Carolina Troop engaged in the campaign against the hostile Cherokee Indians. General McDarvel marched up Catawba River from fort McGravit to [Twanans?] gap and from that point crossed over to French Broad, thence up the river to near its source, thence across the mountains to the over-hill Cherokee towns, which were taken and destroyed by General McDarvils troops. Gen. Williamson of South Carolina, in command of a considerable force of regular troops marched from Charleston against the said Cherokee. He encountered and defeated them on the head of [Tu gals?] River, not far from what were called the Old Towns ( of the Cherokee).

 

Gen Williamson and McDarvel moved upon the middletown of the Cherokee which they captured and destroyed. The Indians then petitioned for peace, which was concluded and the North Carolina troops disbanded and went home. The said Yancey thinks he was disbanded in September of said year 1775, but received no written discharge.

 

The said Yancey further declares that in the year 1781 he was on a visit to his relatives in South Carolina, and at the time he was there troops were called to aid in the besieging of Ninety Six. He volunteered and attached himself to Obid Holloways company, in what was then called the district of Ninety-Six, as well as he can recollect. Capt Holloway marched his company to the siege of Ninety Six, where his company was attached to the command of Colonel Henderson, the besieging army being under the command of General Greens of the United States Army. He, the said Yancey, was [____?] served in the siege of Ninety Six, for the period of six weeks, (forty days, that is from the 22nd of May to 19 Jun 1781), when the place was relieved by a British Army under the command of a British Officer called Lord Bawden, as well as he now recollects. Report said that Lord Bawden brought from Charleston (Which was then in the possession of the British) about eight thousand troops. At all events the force was sufficient to induce Gen. Green to raise the siege of Ninety Six which he did on the 19th of June and crossing the Saluda, encamped on Little River and the company of Capt. Holloway to which the said Yancey belonged was discharged, but he received no written discharge that he now recollects. On the 18th of June he was engaged in the assault by Gen Green's troops on Ninety Six, In which Gen. Green lost from one hundred and fifty to two hundred men.

The said Yancey further declares, that from the circumstance of his having been absent from the Carolinas for more than twenty years, and the lapse of many more years since the date of his said services, he does not know of nor does he believe there is any living witness by whom he can prove his service as in these declarations set forth and detailed.

He, the said Yancey hereby relinquishes every claim whatsoever to a pension or an annuity except the present, and he declares that his name is not on the pension roll of any agency, in any state.

Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid.

We Elijah Spillers and James Oglesby -

Clergymen residing - the said Spillers in Jackson County and the said Oglesby in Franklin County hereby certify that we are well acquainted with Austin Yancey, who has subscribed and sworn to the above declaration; that we believe him to be eighty one years, one month and ten days of age, that he is reputed and believed, in the neighborhood where he resides, to have been a soldier of the revolution, and that we consent in that opinion.

Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid.

(Signed) Elijah Spillers

James Oglesby

James Duncan

NOTE: The above claim was not allowed, as he (Austin) did not serve six months as required by the pension law - Winfield Scott - Commissioner.

 

 


LEWIS YANCEY

REVOLUTIONARY WAR

PENSION FILE IN NATIONAL ARCHIVES

#W2508

State of Georgia, County of Jasper. Jasper Court of Ordinary - January Term 1833. On this seventh day of January 1833, personally appeared in open court before the judges of the court of ordinary, Lewis Yancey, a resident of Jasper County and state of Georgia, aged Seventy One years, who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832. That he was enlisted in the army of the United States in the year 1778 with Robert Yancey, and served in the first regiment of the Continental line under the following named officers: Col Bland commanded the regiment of light Dragoons; John Jimison commanded as Major & Robert Yancey commanded the company and Layton Yancey commanded as Ensign; that he left the service the 24th day of December 1781, serving a tour of three years the whole length of time which he enlisted for. That at the time he entered the service he resided in Culpeper County, in the state of Virginia. That he was engaged in the battle of Guilford in the state of North Carolina and the battle of the siege of Savanaugh in the state of Georgia; that he marched through the states of North and South Carolina and Georgia.

He hereby relinquishes any claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present, and he declares that his name is not on the pension rolls of any agency in any state.

Lewis (X) Yancey

Sworn to & subscribed the day and year aforesaid.

Greene D Brantley, JIC

And the said court do hereby declare their opinion, that the above named applicant was a revolutionary soldier and served as he states.

Green D. Brantley JIC

Edward Price JIC

Rueben E Shorter JIC

State of Georgia, County of Jasper. On this the 7th day of September one thousand eight hundred & fifty three, personally appeared before me, a justice of the inferior court within and for the state and county aforesaid Pheby Yancy, a resident of the county of Jasper in the sate of Georgia aged fifty eight years who first being duly sworn according to law, doth on her oath, make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefits of the provisions made by the act of Congress passed on the 3rd of February 1853, granting pensions to widows of persons who served during the revolutionary War; that she is the widow of Lewis Yancey who was a private in the Army of the Revolution that she is unable to state the nature of the service, that the said Lewis Yancey was a pensioner in his lifetime under the act of Congress passed the 7th day of June 1832, and paid at the agency of Savannah in the state aforesaid. The time when the deceased Lewis Yancey entered and left the service, the name and rank of the officers under whom the service was performed and the place in which he resided when he entered the service. She asks a reference to the evidence filed in his application. She further declares that she was married to the said Lewis Yancey on the 27th day of June 1820; that her said husband died on the 6th of June 1857; that she was not married to him prior to the second of January eighteen hundred, the time above stated she further declares that she is said widow.

Phebey X Yancy

Sworn to and subscribed as the day and year above written.

C.E.F.W. Campbell, JIC

State of Georgia, Jasper County. I, C.E.F.W. Campbell, a justice of the inferior court before whom the above named Pheby Yancy has this day made her declaration for a Pension from bodily infirmity is unable to attend Court. Given under my hand this 7th day of September 1853.

C.E.F.W. Campbell, JIC

State of Georgia, County of Jasper, Personally appeared before me George Curry & David who being duly sworn according to law declares that they were aquatinted with Lewis Yancy, the husband of the above named Pheby Yancy and that he died on the 6th day of June 1857 and that said Pheby Yancy is now a widow.

David C Jones

George Curry

Sworn and subscribed before me this 7th day of September 1853.

C.ER.F.W. Campbell, JIC

 


AMBROSE YANCEY

REVOLUTIONARY WAR

PENSION FILE IN NATIONAL ARCHIVES

#S46059

State of Tennessee, Grainger county. August term 1832. On this 23rd day of August in the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Thirty Two, personally appeared in open court before the justices of our court of _____? ____? and quar__??_ for the county of Grainger now sitting, Ambrose Yancey a resident of the county of Grainger and state of Tennessee aged sixty seven years who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed the seventh of June 1832, that he entered the service of the United States as a mounted rifleman and as a substitute for John Yancey under the following named officers: to wit. Colonel William Campbell, afterward General Campbell in the company commanded by Captain Andrew Colvin on or about the last of August or first of September 1780 and left the service about the first of March 1781. He states that his Lieutenant's name was Samuel _______? and Ensign Robert Campbell. He states that he marched for the state of South Carolina immediately after he joined the company and encamped at a place called the [Cow Pens?] in the state of South Carolina under the command of Col Campbell and Captain Colvin and was immediately after this encampment ordered in pursuit of the British and Tories under the command of Col Ferguson.

He states that the pursued Col. Fergeson from the Cow Pens to Kings Mountain when he overtook him and a battle was fought. He states that in the battle of Kings Mountain there were troops engaged in the battle commanded by Isaac Shelby, John Servier and Benjamin Cleveland and he further states that Col. William Campbell was commander in chief at said battle, that Col. Ferguson the British commander was killed and his army taken and that before he fell he received five bullets in his body. He states that Col. Shelby and Servier commanded the center during the action, that Col. Cleveland commanded the left wing and Col. Campbell the right wing and marched up on the southeast end of the mountain. He states that in the engagement the company commanded by Captain Colvin of which he was one was just in advance of the Virginia Regiment and was ordered to charge on the British advance guard and bring on the engagement and to sustain the action while the main body of the army could be brought into the action. He states that he entered the service in the town of Abington, county of Washington, state of Virginia where he resided when he entered the service. He states that he served with the continental regiment or companies except the Virginia Volunteer Mounted Rifleman but that Gen. Green commanded the southern divisions and any officers communicated with and were directed by Gen. Green as he understood and believes but did not serve in an engagement with him. He states that after the battle of Kings Mountain he was transferred to Capt. Black's company and ordered to join the regiment under the command of Col. Arthur Campbell by Col (Gen) William Campbell in an expedition against the Cherokee Indians. He states that he served in all six months without being discharged or disbanded. He states that he has no documentary evidence and knows of no person whose testimony he can procure who can testify to his service.

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatsoever to a pension or annuity except the present and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of any state. Sworn to and subscribed this day and year first above written.

(Signed)

Ambrose Yancey


PHILEMON YANCEY

REVOLUTIONARY WAR

PENSION FILE IN NATIONAL ARCHIVES

S 1274

[From the National Archives Files: ]

State of Kentucky, County of Franklin

On this 11th day of March 1833, personally appeared in open court before the honorable Samuel Todd, sole judge of the Franklin Circuit Court (a court of [???]) now sitting Philemon Yancey, a resident of the county and state aforesaid, aged seventy-seven years, who being just duly sworn, according to law, doth on this oath, make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of congress passed June 7th 1832.

That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and served as here-in stated.

He entered the service of the United States sometime in the summer or fall of 1779 as substitute for his father Philemon Yancey (who was drafted for eighteen months under the act of the Virginia Legislature of May 1779 to be placed on the [footing?] of the regular troops on the Continental Line) under Captain William Stanton in the county of Culpeper, Virginia where his said father resided. His company was attached to the regiment commanded by Colonel Stubblefield. He recollects that when he entered the service aforesaid he was examined by Colonel James Barbour and Majr Terrell before he was received as a substitute as [aforesaid?]

and on their favorable report he was received as such and entered the service, after which he was marched to the [Rackoon?] fort on the [Rapidan?] in Orange County Virginia which was the place of Rendezvous of his regiment, from thence he was marched with his regiment, to Hillsborough in North Carolina and there joined several other regiments - from thence he was marched to Salisbury - from thence to Charlotte - from thence towards Camden by slow marches and frequently in detachments, stopping at different places for different periods and finally reached Camden. And remained there until the battle at that place which was in the summer and warm weather - afterwards on his march towards the north from the neighborhood of Camden - the prisoners who were taken from the British at the battle of the Cow Pens was put under the command of the troops to which he was attached. He recollects that at the time and during the battle of Guilford Courthouse he was marching with [__ __?] troops to which he was attached on toward Virginia with said prisoners and were near enough to the same to hear the cannon fire during this battle. His marches were continued until his troops reached a place called the New Gardens, from there he was marched to New Kent county stopping at many points not remembered at this day and remained in New Kent County until he had served the full period of eighteen months. When he was set at liberty and went home as the other troops did - shortly after he returned home he enlisted in the service of the United States as a regular soldier in the Continental Army for three years under Captain Thomas Blackwell. He was enlisted by Lieutenant Robert Slaughter [into?] said Blackwell's company. His company belonged to the regiment commanded by Colonel Edmunds. He enlisted in Culpeper County, was marched from there to the [Mobbin?] Hills - from there marched on the lines near Little York and finally was marched to and was at the siege of Little York and remained there in the service until after the surrender of Lord Cornwallis. Some short time after which he was discharged with the other troops to which he was attached.

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present and declares that his name is not on the Pension Roll of the agency of any state.

Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid.

His

Philemon (X) Yancy

Mark

[Mr?] [ left blank ] a clergy man residing in the county of Franklin and state of Kentucky and John McDonald, Joseph Gore, & Edmond Poe and Thomas G. Hancock, residing in the same, hereby certify that we are well acquainted with Philemon Yancy who has subscribed and sworn to the above declaration, that we believe him to be seventy seven years of age. That he is reputed and ?? in the neighborhood where he resides - to have been a soldier of the revolution and that we concur in that opinion sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid.

John McDonald

J. Gore

Edmond Poe

T. G. Hancock

The court then propounded the interrogations to the said Philemon Yancey

 

1st - Where and in what year were you born? Answer - I was born in the county of Culpeper, State of Virginia.

2nd - Have you any record of your age, and if so where is it? Answer - I have no record of my age. My information was received from my parents, as to my age.

3rd - Where were you living when called into the service? Where have you lived since the Revolutionary War, and where do you now live? Answer - I was living in Culpeper Virginia when called into the services both occasions. I remained in said county of Culpeper some time after the war, then moved into Caroline County Virginia, lived there eight years, then in the year 1814 moved to the state of Kentucky and settled in the said county of Franklin and have resided here ever since.

4th - How were you called into the service? Were you drafted? did you volunteer? or were you a substitute and if a substitute for whom? Answer - In my first service I was called in as a substitute for my father Philemon Yancey ?? entered it and served as such for 18 months. In the second service or tour I enlisted as I have in my foregoing declaration states.

5th - State the name of some of the regular officers who were with troops where you served such continental and militia regiments as you can recollect, and general circumstances of your service. Answer - I knew the several officers name din my foregoing declaration also said Regiment. The general circumstances of my service were as above stated in my said declaration. I know the following named officers of the Revolution - Gen Gates, Gen Green, Col A. Buford, Genl Muhlenburg & my uncle Capt after wards ?? Robert Yancey of dragoons.

6th - Did you receive a discharge from the service? and if so by whom was it given and what has become of it? Answer - If I received a discharge on either campaign or service as I have stated I have no recollection of it. I was discharged as my fellow companions were, the same authority & ?? the same time.

7th - State the names of persons to whom you are known in your present neighborhood and who can certify as to your character for veracity, and their belief of your service as a soldier of the Revolution. Answer - John McDonald who knew ?? the service, Jooseph Gore, Edmond Poe & Colonel Thomas G. Hancock who have above certified for me, and many other citizens, my neighbors would doubly do the same. Maj Hed? Triplett knew me well in the service and has frequently recognized me as an old acquaintance in the army, but he has recently been declared a lunatic by the judgment of this honorable court.

And the said court do hereby declare its opinion, after the ?? of the matter and after putting the interrogatory subscribed by the War Department that the above named applicant was a revolutionary soldier and served as he states and the court further certifies that it appears to it that John McDonald, Joseph Gore, Edmund Poe and Thomas G. Hancock who have signed the preceding certificate are residents of the county of Franklin and are credible persons and that their statements are entitled to credit.

I Philip Sargent, clerk of the Franklin Circuit Court in the state of Kentucky do hereby certify that the foregoing contains the original proceedings of the said court in the matter of the application of Philemon Yancey for a pension. In testimony

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[1921 Letter in National Archives File:]

Mrs. W. W. Graves

RFD No 4

Jefferson City, MO

Madam:

In response to your letter of the 4 ultimo, you are advised that the Revolutionary War pensioner S 1274, Philemon Yancey died May 25 1839, the place of his death is not recorded.

Very Respectfully,

Washington Garden

Commissioner

Date of death from Agency Book

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[1939 Letter in National Archives File]

Mrs. G. E. Carraway

38 Edwin Place

Asheville, North Carolina

 

Dear Madam:

Reference is made to your letter in which you request the Revolutionary War record of Philemon Yancey.

The data which follow are found in the papers on file in pension claim S 1274 based upon service in the Revolutionary war, of Philemon Yancey.

Philemon Yancey was born in Culpeper County, Virginia and lived there with his father, Philemon Yancey, at the time of the Revolutionary war, the name of his mother is not shown, nor the date of his birth.

Philemon Yancey enlisted 1779 as substitute for his father, and served 18 months under Capt. Wm Stanton, Col John Stubblefield in the Virginia regiment, during which he marched south, was in the battle of Camden and later marched with prisoners to New Kent County Va where he was discharged. He enlisted shortly after his return to Culpeper Co., Va, served as a private in Capt. Thomas Blackwell's company, Col Edmonds's Va regiment, was in the siege of Yorktown and was discharged shortly after the surrender of Lord Cornwallis.

He continued to reside in Culpeper Co., VA for some time after the Revolutionary war, then moved to Caroline County, that state, and resided 8 years and 1814, moved to Kentucky: He settled in Franklin County, Ky.

Philemon Yancey was allowed pension on his application executed March 11 1833, at which time he resided in Franklin County, Kentucky Hew was then seventy-seven years of age. He died May 25, 1839.

Philemon Yancey made no reference to wife or children. He referred to his uncle Robert Yancey, who was a Captain of Dragoons in the Revolutionary war.

In order to obtain name of person to whom the last payment of pension was made, you should address the Comptroller General, General Accounting Office, Washington D. C. and furnish the following data:

Philemon Yancey,

Certificate No 19529

Issued Sep 17 1833

Rate of $80 per annum

Commenced March 4 1831

Act of June 7 1832, Kentucky Agency.

Very truly yours,

A. D. Miller

Executive Assistant to the Administrator

 


ROBERT YANCEY

REVOLUTIONARY WAR

PENSION FILE IN NATIONAL ARCHIVES

S 35752

[Information From National Archives File:]

[May 23 1818]

United States of America

District of Kentucky, to wit

This day came before me, Robert [Finn?] ? Judge of the District Court of the United States in the district aforesaid, Robert Yancey, a citizen of Woodford County Kentucky who being by me first duly sworn did declare that he served the United States as an officer in the Revolutionary War with Great Britain from the year 1776 until the close of the war in the continental service in the regiment cavalry first commanded by Col. Blaird, afterwards by Col. Anthony W. White - that in the year 1776 he was quartermaster to the regiment. That in 1777 he was a cornet, in 1778 a lieutenant, and in the year 1779 was promoted to the [Captaincy?] in which rank he continued until the end of the war. That he was taken prisoner at Petersburg, Virginia in 1781 and put aboard a prisoner ship for 22 days by Arnold, and upon the arrival of Lord Cornwallis he was put on shore by his order, [but?] continued in captivity until [___?] and was exchanged at the close of the war. That he left his [commissions?] and other documents in Virginia when he [removed?] Kentucky. That he is about 68 years of age and has lost the use of his right arm and hand in a great measure. That he is in reduced circumstances in life and in need of assistance from his country for support for himself and his family and having never received any pension from the United States or any ?? he prays a pension may be granted [herein?]

Robt Yancey

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[Letter from National Archives File: ]

March 10, 1937

Mrs. J. E. Carraway

38 Edwin Place

Asheville, North Carolina

Madam:

Reference is made to your letter in which you request the record of Robert Yancey who served in the Revolutionary War from Virginia and was granted pension in Woodford County, Kentucky. You state that he died in 1828.

The record of Robert Yancey follows as found in pension claim S 35752, based upon his service in the Revolutionary War.

The date and place of birth and names of the parents of Robert Yancey are not shown.

Robert Yancey entered the service in 1776. He served as cornet, regimental quartermaster and Lieutenant of Colonel Theodoric Bland's and Anthony W White's 1st Regiment of Continental Dragoons. In 1779 was commissioned captain of that regiment, on May 10 1781 was taken prisoner at Petersburg, Virginia and remained a prisoner to the close of the Revolution.

Robert Yancey was allowed pension on his application executed May 25 1818, at which time he was a resident of Woodford County, Kentucky, aged about sicty-eight years. At that time he referred to his family but gave no names nor details.

In 1819 he was living in Franklin county, Ky. In 1820 he was living in Woodford Co., Ky and stated that he had no wife or family residing with him, except a daughter, a widow and her 3 children; their names were not stated and there are no further family data.

In order to obtain date of last payment of pension the name and address of the person paid and possibly the exact date of death of Robert Yancey, you should write to the Comptroller General, General Accounting Office, Records Division, this city, and cite the following data:

Robert Yancey, Certificate N 23474

Issued June 28, 1819 Rate of $20 per month

Commenced May 23, 1818 Under Act of March 18 1818 - Kentucky Agency.

Very Truly Yours

A. D. Miller, Executive Assistant to the Administrator

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[Letter NOT found in National Archives - but in private research files]

April 5 1938

Mrs. J. E. Carraway

38 Edwin Place

Asheville, North Carolina

 

Madam:

In reply to your letter of March 7 1938, wherein you request information concerning certain revolutionary War Pensioners, you are advised the records of this office show the following:

On September 3, 1828, satisfactory evidence was presented to a Magistrate for Franklin County Kentucky, that Robert Yancey, a pensioner of the Revolutionary War, certificate No 123474, Kentucky Agency, died November 17 1824. Letters of administration were granted to a son, Robert Yancey, by the County Court in Frankfort, Franklin County, Kentucky on January 17 1825. The arrears of pension due the decedent, covering the period September 4 1824 to November 17 1824 were paid September 27 1828, in Lexington, Kentucky, to Spencer Anderson, an attorney for the administrator. . . .

Respectfully,

P. S. Fallon

Asst Chief, Records Division


LAYTON AND FANNY YANCEY

REVOLUTIONARY WAR

PENSION FILE NATIONAL ARCHIVES

#W7380

[Extracts and/or abstracts of various records found in the National Archives Files: ]

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Letter to the Honorable Speaker of the House of Delegates of Virginia. The petition of Layton Yancey sheweth that he served in the first instance as a cadet in the first regiment of Light Dragoons, commanded by Colonel Bland; that he was afterwards entitled to the rank of Captain and that he served as such under Col. White in the 1st regiment, and that he has received no bounty land coequal with that rank, your petitioner thereof prays that the register may be directed to issue to your petitioner a warrant for the lands which he may be entitled to as a Captain of Dragoons and your petitioner as in duty bound will pray, and etc. signed Layton Yancey

 

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Declaration was made by Fanny Lewis in Rockingham Co. Va 1838 Aug 24, age 67 stating she was married to Leighton Yancey 17 Dec 1788; that he died 4th Apr 1813.

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This is to certify that it appears from a list of this office of such officers and soldiers of the Virginia Continental line, during the Revolutionary war, as settled their accounts, and received certificates for the balance of their full pay, according to an act of assembly, passed the November session 1781, that a certificate issued 12 May 1783, in name of Leyton Yancey, as Lieutenant of Cavalryman, for L 330-17-11, which certificate appears to have been delivered to French Strother and was given for service prior to Jan 1, 1782 - he was Lt. from June 1, 1779 to Jan 1 17882, signed Jas Heath Auditor May 15, 1839.

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Bounty land warrant No 2467 for 200 acres as Lieutenant issued Sep 5, 1796 - no papers.

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A certified copy of Marriage Record is filed by Clerk of Rockingham County Virginia showing the marriage of Layton Yancey and Fanny Lewis daughter of Thomas Lewis of said county 1788 December 12th. One Brewer Reeves signed the marriage bond with the said Yancey.

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Virginia

At a court held for Rockingham County on the 17th day of September 1838 the declaration of Fanny Yancey, widow of Leighton Yancey deceased taken before William B. Yancey, Justice of the Trustees of said county, on the 24th day of August 1838. Together with the certificate of said William B Yancey, Justice as aforesaid hereto [____?] presented in court in consideration thereof is ordered certificate to the War Department.

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United States of America

State of Virginia, Greene County

Be it known that before me, William Sims, a justice of the [___?] for the county aforesaid, personally appeared Frances Yancey [____?] widow in due form of law that she is the identical person who drew a pension under the Act of the 3rd of March 1843 on account of the Revolutionary Service of her husband, the late Leighton Yancey, deceased, at the rate of Four Hundred Dollars per annum, that she now makes the affidavit for the purpose of drawing pension under the act of Congress passed on the 17th July 1844 ?? an act to continue the pensions of certain widows, that she has not inter-married but continues to be a widow that she now resides in the county of Rockingham and State of Virginia and has resided there since her birth. But is at present on a visit to her daughters in the county of Green and state of Virginia. Sworn to and subscribed this 3rd day of March 1845. Frances Yancey

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LEWIS YANCEY - SON OF RICHARD & JUDITH YANCEY
 

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